Home Office Reno, part 3 of… Desk is finally done!

Finally! the desk I dismantled and sanded in April 2020 is finally done 3 months later! If you’ve seen my IG, you know I did have to break my quarantine to go to a home improvement store (for, among other things, a new toilet seat. Toilet seat replacement in an upcoming post). So, of course while I was there, I had to purchase everything I hadn’t in months! So let the painting begin!

Desk before Project (top), and desk after (bottom). Use slider to view each picture.

Painting a desk like this one is fairly straight forward once you have prepped your surface. This required:

  1. Cleaning it out
  2. Removing the top portion ( which required taking off the back part as well)
  3. drilling and nailing some parts together that had come apart over the years
  4. Removing the pulls (handles) and other hardware.
  5. Filling in any holes with Plastic Wood filler (This desk is laminate.)
  6. Dusting, sanding then wiping off sanding with a damp towel.

I put a piece of cardboard under the desk to protect the carpet and so I could paint all the way to the bottom. This desk doesn’t have legs per-se or even furniture risers, so for a clean finish I had to paint it all the way to the ground.

With furniture, always use at least a semi-gloss paint. It costs more, but it is more durable in the long run. There is also cabinet and furniture paint specifically for these jobs that can be tinted. Here I just used a regular water-based latex in semi gloss finish.

Installing the new pulls required me to drill more holes for screws since the pulls are a different size. Always measure if you don’t have a template, so you’ll know where to drill the holes. I did one wrong by just eyeballing and not measuring. Can you tell which one it was?

Lessons Learned

After ripping desk from cardboard, some of the paint went with it!
  • Sand lightly, even if it requires 2 or 3 passes. (This just needed a 220 grit paper to get the shine off.) Some of the areas on the desk were slightly gouged because I was aggressive with the sandpaper.
  • Be prepared for multiple coats. Here, even though my paint had primer in it, I probably should have also primed because we are going from a darker color to a lighter one. this means less actual paint coats. But I had just enough!
  • Cut away the paint before lifting it from the cardboard. Paint adheres. That is how it stays on stuff, unlike stain, which seeps into wood. So when I painted down to the end of the desk, some inevitably got on the cardboard. Which means, the cardboard is now stuck to the bottom of the desk at that point. Of course, I just ripped it up, which caused a messy bottom edge. Tip: Use a craft knife to cut a paint line and prevent the messy edge look.

Overall, I am excited to finish this paint project! It is a pivotal part of the home office renovation. Now on to next steps: hanging my new curtains, cleaning, arranging, and even some more painting. (My bookcase is getting another paint job!) And of course creating some creative accessories–like maybe a new clock?

Home Office Renovation, Part 3 of …

Even though it doesn’t feel like winter here, I have been hibernating in a sense, mostly hunkered down writing my debut romance novel. I have been working on a couple of projects off and on. One is my coffee table up-cycle, and the other is a home office renovation I’ve been talking myself into for months, step- by-step.

I say talking myself into, because with each step, I’m trying to convince myself the whole office needs to be renovated. First, I convinced myself to paint one wall and an old bookcase. Then I added a desk  space–just because I had leftover plywood. Next I painted another wall–everything was all moved around, anyway!

And the latest has been to clean up, relocate, and maybe even up-cycle my main desk area. I mean look at it. It definitely needs an upgrade. Am I up to the task? I don’t know. I have started cleaning the desk up. Whether it can be relocated or up-cycled is for another day. Stay tuned…